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#1: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 16:13:36 by unknown

The best exercises for practice, in my opinion, is one that can be
explained in a couple of sentences, and then give you a lifetime of
work to do. I began doing such an exercise several months ago and
have been amazed at how it has helped my playing.

It is very simple to explain: practice improvising with 2 notes at a
time. 3rds, 4ths, 6ths, 10ths.....whateverths.

Just put on some tracks from Band in a Box (or whatever you use to
practice improvising) and use 2 notes at a time as you improvise. If
you have never done this before, you will be surprised at how crazy
difficult it is to do.

I do it for about an hour at a time, a couple of times per week. At
first it was so difficult that I felt almost unable to improvise at
all. I kept falling back into the same couple of licks over and over.
It gradually got easier, but is still very difficult even after all
these months of practice.

The benefits have shown up in many ways in my playing, in both soloing
and comping. Perhaps the benefits for comping are better than for
soloing, because this exercise opens up the neck in my mind, getting
me further and further away from the "grab a grip" approach to playing
a harmony, and closer and closer to the "playing voices" approach.

If you are an advanced player, just try it next time you are
practicing. You will probably find, like I did, that it is crazy
difficult to do, and that also makes it a good thing to practice as it
fits into one other rule of good practicing: practice what is
difficult for you.

Tim



Tim Berens
<a href="http://timberens.com" target="_blank">http://timberens.com</a>
timb at erinet.com
A Website for Guitarists
Learn Something. Have some fun.

Report this message

#2: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 16:49:19 by Jack Zucker

Excellent advice and a great exercise. I used to work on that a lot
when I was doing trio playing and it really opened my playing up.

Thanks!

Jaz

(Tim Berens) wrote:
&gt; The best exercises for practice, in my opinion, is one that can be
&gt; explained in a couple of sentences, and then give you a lifetime of
&gt; work to do. I began doing such an exercise several months ago and
&gt; have been amazed at how it has helped my playing.
&gt;
&gt; It is very simple to explain: practice improvising with 2 notes at a
&gt; time. 3rds, 4ths, 6ths, 10ths.....whateverths.
&gt;
&gt; Just put on some tracks from Band in a Box (or whatever you use to
&gt; practice improvising) and use 2 notes at a time as you improvise. If
&gt; you have never done this before, you will be surprised at how crazy
&gt; difficult it is to do.
&gt;
&gt; I do it for about an hour at a time, a couple of times per week. At
&gt; first it was so difficult that I felt almost unable to improvise at
&gt; all. I kept falling back into the same couple of licks over and over.
&gt; It gradually got easier, but is still very difficult even after all
&gt; these months of practice.
&gt;
&gt; The benefits have shown up in many ways in my playing, in both soloing
&gt; and comping. Perhaps the benefits for comping are better than for
&gt; soloing, because this exercise opens up the neck in my mind, getting
&gt; me further and further away from the &quot;grab a grip&quot; approach to playing
&gt; a harmony, and closer and closer to the &quot;playing voices&quot; approach.
&gt;
&gt; If you are an advanced player, just try it next time you are
&gt; practicing. You will probably find, like I did, that it is crazy
&gt; difficult to do, and that also makes it a good thing to practice as it
&gt; fits into one other rule of good practicing: practice what is
&gt; difficult for you.
&gt;
&gt; Tim
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Tim Berens
&gt; <a href="http://timberens.com" target="_blank">http://timberens.com</a>
&gt; timb at erinet.com
&gt; A Website for Guitarists
&gt; Learn Something. Have some fun.

Report this message

#3: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 16:55:47 by jseaberry

Jack Zucker wrote:
&gt; Excellent advice and a great exercise. I used to work on that a lot
&gt; when I was doing trio playing and it really opened my playing up.
&gt;
&gt; Thanks!
&gt;
&gt; Jaz
&gt;
&gt; (Tim Berens) wrote:
&gt; &gt; The best exercises for practice, in my opinion, is one that can be
&gt; &gt; explained in a couple of sentences, and then give you a lifetime of
&gt; &gt; work to do. I began doing such an exercise several months ago and
&gt; &gt; have been amazed at how it has helped my playing.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; It is very simple to explain: practice improvising with 2 notes at a
&gt; &gt; time. 3rds, 4ths, 6ths, 10ths.....whateverths.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; Just put on some tracks from Band in a Box (or whatever you use to
&gt; &gt; practice improvising) and use 2 notes at a time as you improvise. If
&gt; &gt; you have never done this before, you will be surprised at how crazy
&gt; &gt; difficult it is to do.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; I do it for about an hour at a time, a couple of times per week. At
&gt; &gt; first it was so difficult that I felt almost unable to improvise at
&gt; &gt; all. I kept falling back into the same couple of licks over and over.
&gt; &gt; It gradually got easier, but is still very difficult even after all
&gt; &gt; these months of practice.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; The benefits have shown up in many ways in my playing, in both soloing
&gt; &gt; and comping. Perhaps the benefits for comping are better than for
&gt; &gt; soloing, because this exercise opens up the neck in my mind, getting
&gt; &gt; me further and further away from the &quot;grab a grip&quot; approach to playing
&gt; &gt; a harmony, and closer and closer to the &quot;playing voices&quot; approach.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; If you are an advanced player, just try it next time you are
&gt; &gt; practicing. You will probably find, like I did, that it is crazy
&gt; &gt; difficult to do, and that also makes it a good thing to practice as it
&gt; &gt; fits into one other rule of good practicing: practice what is
&gt; &gt; difficult for you.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; Tim
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; Tim Berens
&gt; &gt; <a href="http://timberens.com" target="_blank">http://timberens.com</a>
&gt; &gt; timb at erinet.com
&gt; &gt; A Website for Guitarists
&gt; &gt; Learn Something. Have some fun.


Thank you sir; great idea. Seems like it will really emphasize the
rhythmic aspects. Thanks.

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#4: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 17:05:35 by Tom Walls

In article &lt;<a href="mailto:44c0dbfb.3015046&#64;news.erinet.com" target="_blank">44c0dbfb.3015046&#64;news.erinet.com</a>&gt;, (Tim Berens) says...
&gt; The best exercises for practice, in my opinion, is one that can be
&gt; explained in a couple of sentences, and then give you a lifetime of
&gt; work to do. I began doing such an exercise several months ago and
&gt; have been amazed at how it has helped my playing.
&gt;
&gt; It is very simple to explain: practice improvising with 2 notes at a
&gt; time. 3rds, 4ths, 6ths, 10ths.....whateverths.
&gt;
&gt; Just put on some tracks from Band in a Box (or whatever you use to
&gt; practice improvising) and use 2 notes at a time as you improvise. If
&gt; you have never done this before, you will be surprised at how crazy
&gt; difficult it is to do.
&gt;
&gt; I do it for about an hour at a time, a couple of times per week. At
&gt; first it was so difficult that I felt almost unable to improvise at
&gt; all. I kept falling back into the same couple of licks over and over.
&gt; It gradually got easier, but is still very difficult even after all
&gt; these months of practice.
&gt;
&gt; The benefits have shown up in many ways in my playing, in both soloing
&gt; and comping. Perhaps the benefits for comping are better than for
&gt; soloing, because this exercise opens up the neck in my mind, getting
&gt; me further and further away from the &quot;grab a grip&quot; approach to playing
&gt; a harmony, and closer and closer to the &quot;playing voices&quot; approach.
&gt;
&gt; If you are an advanced player, just try it next time you are
&gt; practicing. You will probably find, like I did, that it is crazy
&gt; difficult to do, and that also makes it a good thing to practice as it
&gt; fits into one other rule of good practicing: practice what is
&gt; difficult for you.
&gt;
&gt; Tim
&gt;
&gt;
You're talking double stops, or two notes in sequence?
--
Tom Walls
the guy at the Temple of Zeus

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#5: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 17:48:18 by Jazz Guy

Is this similar to an excercise where on the first and fourth beat of
the bar, play the 3rd and then the 7th note of each chord/scale on a
2-5-1 progression. Continue playing the 3rd and 7th notes as the 2-5-1
progression is repeated around the cycle of fourths.

This outlines how notes link the chords in the 2-5-1's in all keys.

Example:

For
|Dmin7|G7 |Cmaj7|Cmaj7|
I use
|F C|B F|E B|E B|

Thanks

Guy

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#6: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 17:58:33 by MashaAndMarty

Tim,

Just to join the chorus, I like this - EXCELLENT for getting the
various harmony points in your head.

Thanks!
Marty

(Tim Berens) wrote:
&gt; The best exercises for practice, in my opinion, is one that can be
&gt; explained in a couple of sentences, and then give you a lifetime of
&gt; work to do. I began doing such an exercise several months ago and
&gt; have been amazed at how it has helped my playing.
&gt;
&gt; It is very simple to explain: practice improvising with 2 notes at a
&gt; time. 3rds, 4ths, 6ths, 10ths.....whateverths.
&gt;
&gt; Just put on some tracks from Band in a Box (or whatever you use to
&gt; practice improvising) and use 2 notes at a time as you improvise. If
&gt; you have never done this before, you will be surprised at how crazy
&gt; difficult it is to do.
&gt;
&gt; I do it for about an hour at a time, a couple of times per week. At
&gt; first it was so difficult that I felt almost unable to improvise at
&gt; all. I kept falling back into the same couple of licks over and over.
&gt; It gradually got easier, but is still very difficult even after all
&gt; these months of practice.
&gt;
&gt; The benefits have shown up in many ways in my playing, in both soloing
&gt; and comping. Perhaps the benefits for comping are better than for
&gt; soloing, because this exercise opens up the neck in my mind, getting
&gt; me further and further away from the &quot;grab a grip&quot; approach to playing
&gt; a harmony, and closer and closer to the &quot;playing voices&quot; approach.
&gt;
&gt; If you are an advanced player, just try it next time you are
&gt; practicing. You will probably find, like I did, that it is crazy
&gt; difficult to do, and that also makes it a good thing to practice as it
&gt; fits into one other rule of good practicing: practice what is
&gt; difficult for you.
&gt;
&gt; Tim
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Tim Berens
&gt; <a href="http://timberens.com" target="_blank">http://timberens.com</a>
&gt; timb at erinet.com
&gt; A Website for Guitarists
&gt; Learn Something. Have some fun.

Report this message

#7: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 18:35:37 by jdahlste

Barney Kessel and Tommy Tedesco have recommended doing this for years.
3rds and
6ths are my favorites on straight ahead jazz but should be used
intertwined for a full
sound. They are the most difficult to finger during fast solos also.

Report this message

#8: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 18:48:37 by Clay Moore

(Tim Berens) wrote:

&gt; It is very simple to explain: practice improvising with 2 notes at a
&gt; time. 3rds, 4ths, 6ths, 10ths.....whateverths.
&gt;
&gt; Just put on some tracks from Band in a Box (or whatever you use to
&gt; practice improvising) and use 2 notes at a time as you improvise. If
&gt; you have never done this before, you will be surprised at how crazy
&gt; difficult it is to do.

Hi Tim,

This is something I've been doing for many years, for all the reasons
you are citing here. I remember Howard Roberts mentioning this in one
of his books, probably &quot;Manual Chord Melody,&quot; saying that this was one
of the great little-explored areas of guitar playing. I started doing
this partly because I spend so much time in playing situations as the
only chordal instrument. But yeah, it never stops being a challenge.

Clay Moore
<a href="http://www.claymoore.com" target="_blank">http://www.claymoore.com</a>

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#9: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 18:59:21 by charles robinson

That's a good one Tim. I'm noticing that it can also cause you to play some
different rhythms over the top of the beat
Charlie

&lt;Tim Berens&gt; wrote in message news:<a href="mailto:44c0dbfb.3015046&#64;news.erinet.com..." target="_blank">44c0dbfb.3015046&#64;news.erinet.com...</a>
&gt; The best exercises for practice, in my opinion, is one that can be
&gt; explained in a couple of sentences, and then give you a lifetime of
&gt; work to do. I began doing such an exercise several months ago and
&gt; have been amazed at how it has helped my playing.
&gt;
&gt; It is very simple to explain: practice improvising with 2 notes at a
&gt; time. 3rds, 4ths, 6ths, 10ths.....whateverths.
&gt;
&gt; Just put on some tracks from Band in a Box (or whatever you use to
&gt; practice improvising) and use 2 notes at a time as you improvise. If
&gt; you have never done this before, you will be surprised at how crazy
&gt; difficult it is to do.
&gt;
&gt; I do it for about an hour at a time, a couple of times per week. At
&gt; first it was so difficult that I felt almost unable to improvise at
&gt; all. I kept falling back into the same couple of licks over and over.
&gt; It gradually got easier, but is still very difficult even after all
&gt; these months of practice.
&gt;
&gt; The benefits have shown up in many ways in my playing, in both soloing
&gt; and comping. Perhaps the benefits for comping are better than for
&gt; soloing, because this exercise opens up the neck in my mind, getting
&gt; me further and further away from the &quot;grab a grip&quot; approach to playing
&gt; a harmony, and closer and closer to the &quot;playing voices&quot; approach.
&gt;
&gt; If you are an advanced player, just try it next time you are
&gt; practicing. You will probably find, like I did, that it is crazy
&gt; difficult to do, and that also makes it a good thing to practice as it
&gt; fits into one other rule of good practicing: practice what is
&gt; difficult for you.
&gt;
&gt; Tim
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Tim Berens
&gt; <a href="http://timberens.com" target="_blank">http://timberens.com</a>
&gt; timb at erinet.com
&gt; A Website for Guitarists
&gt; Learn Something. Have some fun.

Report this message

#10: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 19:15:28 by Joey Goldstein

tom walls wrote:

&gt; You're talking double stops, or two notes in sequence?

I think he means limiting your note choice to just using a particular
interval.

So, if you decide to work with min 3rds, you would make sure that every
successive pair of notes forms a min 3rd interval.

On Cmaj7 you might play a line like this:
B D, E G, A F#, A C, C# A#, B D....
Etc.

Working with maj 3rds you could get:
C E, B G, F# D, Db F, E C....
etc.

The result is that the interval serves as a sort of theme that you
continue to develop which adds coherence to your lines.

Another thing, along the same lines, but a little more &quot;out&quot; and pattern
oriented is to design patterns based on a single interval taken thru
various transpositions.

Eg. Working with maj 3rds (4 semitones) you might come up with this:
up 4 - up 2, down 4 - up 1, repeat etc.
which if you started on C would be
C E, F# D, &gt; Eb G, A F, &gt; Gb Bb, C Ab, &gt; G etc. (which could be played
over Cmaj7 too)

Again, the chosen interval and the repetition of the selected
transpositions serves to add a coherent thread thru the line, even
though it weaves outside of the chord.

These types of patterns are real good for transcending your current
technical capabilities.

--
Joey Goldstein
<a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

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#11: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 19:19:54 by Gerry

In article &lt;<a href="mailto:1153499737.411892.195370&#64;m79g2000cwm.googlegroups.com" target="_blank">1153499737.411892.195370&#64;m79g2000cwm.googlegroups.com</a>&gt;,
&lt;&quot;<a href="mailto:jdahlste&#64;uiuc.edu" target="_blank">jdahlste&#64;uiuc.edu</a>&quot;&gt; wrote:

&gt; Barney Kessel and Tommy Tedesco have recommended doing this for
&gt; years. 3rds and 6ths are my favorites on straight ahead jazz but
&gt; should be used intertwined for a full sound. They are the most
&gt; difficult to finger during fast solos also.

A question upstream whether this referred to single notes or
double-stops: both.

I like doing fourths too. Makes me feel tynereseque.

--
Ten years searching in the deep forest. Today great laughter at the edge of the
lake. -- Soen

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#12: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 19:35:16 by Tom Walls

In article &lt;e9r23j$uj2$<a href="mailto:1&#64;news.datemas.de" target="_blank">1&#64;news.datemas.de</a>&gt;, <a href="mailto:nospam&#64;nowhere.net" target="_blank">nospam&#64;nowhere.net</a> says...

&gt;
&gt; I think he means limiting your note choice to just using a particular
&gt; interval.
&gt;
&gt;
snip
&gt;
&gt; These types of patterns are real good for transcending your current
&gt; technical capabilities.
&gt;
&gt;
Thanks. Seems rather demanding. I can see why he recommended it to
advanced players. I suppose that one could just work out some licks, but
I'm thinking it's really something you should do on the fly.
--
Tom Walls
the guy at the Temple of Zeus

Report this message

#13: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 19:38:14 by jseaberry

Joey Goldstein wrote:
&gt; tom walls wrote:
&gt;
&gt; &gt; You're talking double stops, or two notes in sequence?
&gt;
&gt; I think he means limiting your note choice to just using a particular
&gt; interval.
&gt;
&gt; So, if you decide to work with min 3rds, you would make sure that every
&gt; successive pair of notes forms a min 3rd interval.
&gt;
&gt; On Cmaj7 you might play a line like this:
&gt; B D, E G, A F#, A C, C# A#, B D....
&gt; Etc.
&gt;
&gt; Working with maj 3rds you could get:
&gt; C E, B G, F# D, Db F, E C....
&gt; etc.
&gt;
&gt; The result is that the interval serves as a sort of theme that you
&gt; continue to develop which adds coherence to your lines.
&gt;
&gt; Another thing, along the same lines, but a little more &quot;out&quot; and pattern
&gt; oriented is to design patterns based on a single interval taken thru
&gt; various transpositions.
&gt;
&gt; Eg. Working with maj 3rds (4 semitones) you might come up with this:
&gt; up 4 - up 2, down 4 - up 1, repeat etc.
&gt; which if you started on C would be
&gt; C E, F# D, &gt; Eb G, A F, &gt; Gb Bb, C Ab, &gt; G etc. (which could be played
&gt; over Cmaj7 too)
&gt;
&gt; Again, the chosen interval and the repetition of the selected
&gt; transpositions serves to add a coherent thread thru the line, even
&gt; though it weaves outside of the chord.
&gt;
&gt; These types of patterns are real good for transcending your current
&gt; technical capabilities.
&gt;
&gt; --
&gt; Joey Goldstein
&gt; <a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
&gt; joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

Good explanation, Mr. G; thank you.

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#14: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 19:53:23 by Joey Goldstein

tom walls wrote:
&gt; In article &lt;e9r23j$uj2$<a href="mailto:1&#64;news.datemas.de" target="_blank">1&#64;news.datemas.de</a>&gt;, <a href="mailto:nospam&#64;nowhere.net" target="_blank">nospam&#64;nowhere.net</a> says...
&gt;
&gt;&gt; I think he means limiting your note choice to just using a particular
&gt;&gt; interval.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt;
&gt; snip
&gt;&gt; These types of patterns are real good for transcending your current
&gt;&gt; technical capabilities.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt;
&gt; Thanks. Seems rather demanding. I can see why he recommended it to
&gt; advanced players. I suppose that one could just work out some licks, but
&gt; I'm thinking it's really something you should do on the fly.

The original idea, from the OP, isn't all that hard.

The secondary idea that I outlined is a little tricky though.

But you can also approach it all from more of a free-improv angle and
just freely play stuff that's derived from the chosen interval. It'll
still have some level of coherence simply by virtue of the repeated
interval.

--
Joey Goldstein
<a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

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#15: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 19:54:27 by Patrick Hanrahan

I would image it gets much more difficult as the interval get wider and
wider.

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#16: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 22:20:21 by jdahlste

At a Tommy Tedesco clinic I attended Tommy started playing a 4/4
straight ahead solo
and then told the group watching to tell him when to play 2nds, 3rds &amp;
6ths, 4ths &amp; 5ths,
and octaves. About every 20 seconds someone would ask him to change and
he would
keep on playing the solo and building it with only changing whether he
was playing 3rds &amp;
6ths, or 4ths etc....I can say with confidence that if any guitar
player in my town of 130,000
could solo well doing that, it would set that guitarist apart from the
rest. Most everybody
can play octaves and 4ths...those 3rds &amp; 6ths are a bear if used in a
coherent solo at a
medium tempo or faster.

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#17: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-21 23:05:23 by GridKid

I think I understand the exercise but want to be sure....are you
saying, for any given chord you can only use two notes? Like, the root
and the third or the root and the 6th or whatever of that chord? Or
that you just play those two notes in a row and let the rest of the
measure go by (the Jamey Abersold way)?

Report this message

#18: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-22 15:43:19 by unknown

On Fri, 21 Jul 2006 11:05:35 -0400, tom walls &lt;<a href="mailto:tw25&#64;cornell.edu" target="_blank">tw25&#64;cornell.edu</a>&gt;
wrote:

&gt;&gt;
&gt;You're talking double stops, or two notes in sequence?

Tom:

Double stops -- 2 notes at a time. I use 3rds sometimes, 4ths, 5ths,
whatever. It's fun (and challengin) to vary the interval that you
use. Sometimes one note stays in place and the other note moves.
Sometimes they move together....very rarely they move opposite
directions (this is much trickier for me to calculate).

Tim


Tim Berens
<a href="http://timberens.com" target="_blank">http://timberens.com</a>
timb at erinet.com
A Website for Guitarists
Learn Something. Have some fun.

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#19: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-22 15:45:26 by unknown

On 21 Jul 2006 14:05:23 -0700, &quot;GridKid&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:gridguy&#64;musicalexica.com" target="_blank">gridguy&#64;musicalexica.com</a>&gt;
wrote:

&gt;I think I understand the exercise but want to be sure....are you
&gt;saying, for any given chord you can only use two notes? Like, the root
&gt;and the third or the root and the 6th or whatever of that chord? Or
&gt;that you just play those two notes in a row and let the rest of the
&gt;measure go by (the Jamey Abersold way)?
&gt;

It means to play two notes simultaneously, like playing C and E
together over a C major chord.

Tim


Tim Berens
<a href="http://timberens.com" target="_blank">http://timberens.com</a>
timb at erinet.com
A Website for Guitarists
Learn Something. Have some fun.

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#20: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-22 17:50:39 by Joe Finn

Tim: Thanks for another productive, practical and useful suggestion.
.......joe

--
Visit me on the web www.JoeFinn.net
&lt;Tim Berens&gt; wrote in message news:<a href="mailto:44c0dbfb.3015046&#64;news.erinet.com..." target="_blank">44c0dbfb.3015046&#64;news.erinet.com...</a>
&gt; The best exercises for practice, in my opinion, is one that can be
&gt; explained in a couple of sentences, and then give you a lifetime of
&gt; work to do. I began doing such an exercise several months ago and
&gt; have been amazed at how it has helped my playing.
&gt;
&gt; It is very simple to explain: practice improvising with 2 notes at a
&gt; time. 3rds, 4ths, 6ths, 10ths.....whateverths.
&gt;
&gt; Just put on some tracks from Band in a Box (or whatever you use to
&gt; practice improvising) and use 2 notes at a time as you improvise. If
&gt; you have never done this before, you will be surprised at how crazy
&gt; difficult it is to do.
&gt;
&gt; I do it for about an hour at a time, a couple of times per week. At
&gt; first it was so difficult that I felt almost unable to improvise at
&gt; all. I kept falling back into the same couple of licks over and over.
&gt; It gradually got easier, but is still very difficult even after all
&gt; these months of practice.
&gt;
&gt; The benefits have shown up in many ways in my playing, in both soloing
&gt; and comping. Perhaps the benefits for comping are better than for
&gt; soloing, because this exercise opens up the neck in my mind, getting
&gt; me further and further away from the &quot;grab a grip&quot; approach to playing
&gt; a harmony, and closer and closer to the &quot;playing voices&quot; approach.
&gt;
&gt; If you are an advanced player, just try it next time you are
&gt; practicing. You will probably find, like I did, that it is crazy
&gt; difficult to do, and that also makes it a good thing to practice as it
&gt; fits into one other rule of good practicing: practice what is
&gt; difficult for you.
&gt;
&gt; Tim
&gt;
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Tim Berens
&gt; <a href="http://timberens.com" target="_blank">http://timberens.com</a>
&gt; timb at erinet.com
&gt; A Website for Guitarists
&gt; Learn Something. Have some fun.

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#21: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-22 18:32:22 by Joey Goldstein

Tim Berens wrote:
&gt; On 21 Jul 2006 14:05:23 -0700, &quot;GridKid&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:gridguy&#64;musicalexica.com" target="_blank">gridguy&#64;musicalexica.com</a>&gt;
&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt;&gt; I think I understand the exercise but want to be sure....are you
&gt;&gt; saying, for any given chord you can only use two notes? Like, the root
&gt;&gt; and the third or the root and the 6th or whatever of that chord? Or
&gt;&gt; that you just play those two notes in a row and let the rest of the
&gt;&gt; measure go by (the Jamey Abersold way)?
&gt;&gt;
&gt;
&gt; It means to play two notes simultaneously, like playing C and E
&gt; together over a C major chord.

Oh. I must have misunderstood then.
It sounds like you *are* talking about playing double stops then, right?

The things that I was talking about are different and involve single
note playing more so than double stops.

--
Joey Goldstein
<a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

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#22: Re: A valuable exercise for advanced players

Posted on 2006-07-23 18:06:03 by Paul Sanwald

ever since I started studying classical things like this are way easier
for me (probably has something to do with all those 3rds and 6ths in
the sor studies). anyone else find this?

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