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#1: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-17 21:00:45 by LuncheonmeatBowl

Personally, I think they have their place. Lately, I've been hearing
'avoid slash chords' from various sources. Is that what's being taught in
college jazz theory courses these days?

Of course, certain slash chords can be avoided because there are easier
ways to express them. Gm/E, for example, is easier to read as an Em7(b5),
(or E half-diminished-symbol 7).

In my view, if a chord is an inversion, then it should be labelled as such,
thought the use of a slash chord. Simple example: C7/Bb, especially if
the context of a chord sequence suggests it: C7, C7/Bb, F/A, Fm6/Ab, that
kind of thing. If you were to write that sequence out without using slash
chords, I'm quite sure it would be harder to read - for me, anyways.

Other times, a voicing can be expressed though a slash chord. For
instance, if I see Abmaj7/Bb, it suggests a voicing to me, whereas Bb11
does not.

One thing I've noticed is that some bass players have problem reading slash
chords. I'm not sure why - it should be easy, just read the bottom half of
the slash. Right? Well, you'd think so, but some lesser players I've
worked with seem to have a problem with it. So, if I'm writing a chart
specifically for bass, I'll go out of my way to avoid slash chords, or
write out the notes. But for a lead sheet, I have no problem with them,
if they make sense, if they're appropriate.

What do y'all think?

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#2: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-17 21:51:30 by ninelives

I don't care for them.
Morris Nelms
<a href="http://www.geocities.com/jazzmonk2001/Morris_Nelms_Web_Site.html" target="_blank"> http://www.geocities.com/jazzmonk2001/Morris_Nelms_Web_Site. html</a>

&quot;Richard Whitehouse&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:LuncheonmeatBowl&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">LuncheonmeatBowl&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:q7Rug.40495$<a href="mailto:No3.38477&#64;newsfe14.lga..." target="_blank">No3.38477&#64;newsfe14.lga...</a>
&gt; Personally, I think they have their place. Lately, I've been hearing
&gt; 'avoid slash chords' from various sources. Is that what's being taught in
&gt; college jazz theory courses these days?
&gt;
&gt; Of course, certain slash chords can be avoided because there are easier
&gt; ways to express them. Gm/E, for example, is easier to read as an Em7(b5),
&gt; (or E half-diminished-symbol 7).
&gt;
&gt; In my view, if a chord is an inversion, then it should be labelled as
&gt; such,
&gt; thought the use of a slash chord. Simple example: C7/Bb, especially if
&gt; the context of a chord sequence suggests it: C7, C7/Bb, F/A, Fm6/Ab,
&gt; that
&gt; kind of thing. If you were to write that sequence out without using
&gt; slash
&gt; chords, I'm quite sure it would be harder to read - for me, anyways.
&gt;
&gt; Other times, a voicing can be expressed though a slash chord. For
&gt; instance, if I see Abmaj7/Bb, it suggests a voicing to me, whereas Bb11
&gt; does not.
&gt;
&gt; One thing I've noticed is that some bass players have problem reading
&gt; slash
&gt; chords. I'm not sure why - it should be easy, just read the bottom half
&gt; of
&gt; the slash. Right? Well, you'd think so, but some lesser players I've
&gt; worked with seem to have a problem with it. So, if I'm writing a chart
&gt; specifically for bass, I'll go out of my way to avoid slash chords, or
&gt; write out the notes. But for a lead sheet, I have no problem with them,
&gt; if they make sense, if they're appropriate.
&gt;
&gt; What do y'all think?

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#3: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-17 21:59:40 by Nil

On 17 Jul 2006, &lt;<a href="mailto:ninelives&#64;grandecom.net" target="_blank">ninelives&#64;grandecom.net</a>&gt; wrote in
news:<a href="mailto:12bnqk1jood2n6b&#64;corp.supernews.com" target="_blank">12bnqk1jood2n6b&#64;corp.supernews.com</a>:

&gt; I don't care for them.

I like them! I want to see wider use of them.

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#4: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-17 22:21:38 by derek

Sometimes they are a way to notate a certain inversion, so I find them
valuable in that regard. When I see a new lead sheet, that is the
first thing I look for. I try to figure out what the composer is
asking for, and make note of it on the page. They can certainly be
ignored for more garden variety chords and let the bass player hit the
asked for bass note.

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#5: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-18 00:06:03 by Jack Zucker

&quot;Richard Whitehouse&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:LuncheonmeatBowl&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">LuncheonmeatBowl&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:q7Rug.40495$<a href="mailto:No3.38477&#64;newsfe14.lga..." target="_blank">No3.38477&#64;newsfe14.lga...</a>
&gt; Personally, I think they have their place. Lately, I've been hearing
&gt; 'avoid slash chords' from various sources. Is that what's being taught in
&gt; college jazz theory courses these days?

I hope not. Saying &quot;no&quot; to slash chords is akin to saying no to flat 9s.
Sheesh...

--
<a href="http://www.myspace.com/jackzucker" target="_blank">http://www.myspace.com/jackzucker</a>
<a href="http://www.sheetsofsound.net" target="_blank">http://www.sheetsofsound.net</a>

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#6: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-18 00:23:58 by sgcim

Derek wrote:
&gt; Sometimes they are a way to notate a certain inversion, so I find them
&gt; valuable in that regard. When I see a new lead sheet, that is the
&gt; first thing I look for. I try to figure out what the composer is
&gt; asking for, and make note of it on the page. They can certainly be
&gt; ignored for more garden variety chords and let the bass player hit the
&gt; asked for bass note.
Sightreading slash chords can present some problems.
You've just spent 200 measures reading chord progressions that have
modulated 5 or 6 times (like in &quot;Swing&quot; the last show I did) and all of
a sudden you see Ab/ Gb, then Gb/Ab, then C#m7/F#, etc... it's not that
easy to suddenly change your way of reading chord symbols at a fast
tempo.
I even got some bi-chords in that show, like Bb13#11/Ab7, and i just
played the first, top chord.
When I write charts for bass players, I write out the actual bass note
I want played, rather than confuse them with the Ab/Gb, Gb/Ab, G/A
etc...
If you're playing with a bass player, there's not as great a need for
you to play the same inversions as the bottom note the bass is playing,
but it does help you voice the chords more effectively for the music if
there's a nice descending bass line for the progression.

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#7: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-18 01:19:34 by ottguit

I could live with slash chordsif the Chord and Bass note were in
diefferent fonts, eg Larger Font for Chord and smaller for the Bass.

I guess I'm slightly dyslexic? If I see Ab/Gb I can easly play Gb/Ab
instead, I can't separate the info, not even to play just the chord,
maybe if the Fonts were different...
Bg

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#8: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-18 01:24:09 by Joey Goldstein

Hey Rich. How's it goin'?

IMO, slash chords that could be written some other not-too-complicated
way probably should be written that way, or at least that's what I
prefer to see. Most copyists would probably disagree though because
slash chords are so economical as far as space on a page is concerned.

But bear with me....
Here's the changes to one of John MacLeod's tunes (Life In The Studio)
as he has them written on his chart (i.e. the way I'm expected to sight
read/blow over them...Note: But I'm woodshedding now.):

It's in 3/4:

Bsus/C Bmaj7#11 F#maj7#11/A# Fmaj7#11/A
|----4----|----4---|------4------|-----4-----|


E7alt/A E7alt/G E7alt/F
|---2---|----2----|----4---|

F/E G/Eb Bsus/C# G/C#
|--2--|--2--|---3----|--3---| repeat

Now, some of those I appreciate seeing the way they are. Most of them
have to be written that way even if I don't appreciate it.

Bsus/C really parses to Cmaj7b5, but by thinking of it as a B7sus4(b9)
type of sound I can hear all sorts of cool ways to use D#'s that I
probably would be thinking about if it was written as Cmaj7b5. Still, if
I was writing that chart I would have called it Cmaj7b5. I can still
make the logical leap of seeing the Bsus triad as a subset of Cmaj7b5
and make the decision to play Bsus-ish stuff or not.

F#maj7#11/A# and Fmaj7#11/A probably make the most sense here too, but I
hear those chords and blow over them as A#m (aeolian) and Am (aeolian),
i.e. the same way I'd blow over A#m if it was Im and Am aif it was Im. I
don't think I'd go as far as renaming the chords to A#m(add9)(addb6) and
Am(add9)(addb6), but that's how I hear them.

E7alt/A...well, I still can't really hear what John's after here. It
might be that he doesn't think of &quot;alt&quot; as supposedly meaning the
altered scale, like I do.
But I'm starting to get some mileage out of hearing these E7alt bars
(including the E7alt/G and E7alt/F) as having a bit of a bi-tonal thing
going on, and I just let the bass handle the opposing tonal centre.
I hear E7alt more as a Bb7(9,#11,13)/E, so I basically blow through
these bars like I'm playing on Bb7 and hope for the best!
So, unless I'm totally misreading John's intentions here I can't think
of any other way that makes more sense to notate these 3 chords.
E7alt/G parses as G13sus4b9 though and E7alt/F parses nicely as
Fm(maj7)(9,11,13).

When we get to F/E, it never sounds strong to me when I treat this like
an F (lyd) chord. I hear the E in the bass as really commanding the
tonal centre here and it sounds more right to me to play over this as
some sort of Em(phrygian) chord. But there isn't an Em type of chord
symbol that really gets that F/E sound happening. So F/E it is.

Now, for G/Eb, I really wish he'd written it as Ebmaj7#5 or Cm(maj7)/Eb,
because that's how I hear it, for now.
When I was first sight reading through this tune I tried to get some
bi-tonal stuff happening by playing more G-ish things, but it never
really worked.

Bsus/C#...I'd much rather see C#m7(11)(no5th) when I'm sight
reading/soloing.

My first reaction when I see G/C# is that it's a C# altered setting,
because 9 times out of 10 that's what it is. But in this tune treating
that chord that way never quite makes it for me.
I really hear this one as a G lydian setting where C# just happens to be
in the bass, especially since the next chord after the repeat, Bsus/C,
is essentially a C lydian setting. G ly to c lyd has a nice progressive
feeling to it.
Would I change the chord symbol to anything else?
Probably not.
But maybe seeing &quot;G(lyd)/C#&quot; might have helped me out the first time
playing through this tune.
I certainly wouldn't write it as &quot;C#m7b5(no3rd)(b9)&quot;.

So, for the most part, except for 2 or 3 of them, John couldn't have
written these chords any other way.
.........


But most times I see C/D, I'd rather see D9sus4, unless it's absolutely
critical to not have an A in the voicing, and I can't see how that would
ever be. There's a few other slash chords of that ilk out there. But
by-and-large, for things that can't be written some other way, slash
chords are the only choice.

--
Joey Goldstein
<a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

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#9: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-18 01:25:35 by Joey Goldstein

<a href="mailto:ottguit&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">ottguit&#64;hotmail.com</a> wrote:
&gt; I could live with slash chordsif the Chord and Bass note were in
&gt; diefferent fonts, eg Larger Font for Chord and smaller for the Bass.
&gt;
&gt; I guess I'm slightly dyslexic? If I see Ab/Gb I can easly play Gb/Ab
&gt; instead, I can't separate the info, not even to play just the chord,
&gt; maybe if the Fonts were different...
&gt; Bg
&gt;

My right hand only seems to have 1 font available.
SloppyJoe.fnt.

--
Joey Goldstein
<a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

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#10: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-18 02:04:13 by peek

Richard Whitehouse wrote:
&gt; Personally, I think they have their place. Lately, I've been hearing
&gt; 'avoid slash chords' from various sources. Is that what's being taught in
&gt; college jazz theory courses these days?
&gt;
&gt; Of course, certain slash chords can be avoided because there are easier
&gt; ways to express them. Gm/E, for example, is easier to read as an Em7(b5),
&gt; (or E half-diminished-symbol 7).
&gt;
&gt; In my view, if a chord is an inversion, then it should be labelled as such,
&gt; thought the use of a slash chord. Simple example: C7/Bb, especially if
&gt; the context of a chord sequence suggests it: C7, C7/Bb, F/A, Fm6/Ab, that
&gt; kind of thing. If you were to write that sequence out without using slash
&gt; chords, I'm quite sure it would be harder to read - for me, anyways.
&gt;
&gt; Other times, a voicing can be expressed though a slash chord. For
&gt; instance, if I see Abmaj7/Bb, it suggests a voicing to me, whereas Bb11
&gt; does not.
&gt;
&gt; One thing I've noticed is that some bass players have problem reading slash
&gt; chords. I'm not sure why - it should be easy, just read the bottom half of
&gt; the slash. Right? Well, you'd think so, but some lesser players I've
&gt; worked with seem to have a problem with it. So, if I'm writing a chart
&gt; specifically for bass, I'll go out of my way to avoid slash chords, or
&gt; write out the notes. But for a lead sheet, I have no problem with them,
&gt; if they make sense, if they're appropriate.
&gt;
&gt; What do y'all think?
I like slash chords but, what do I know, I'm a Bass player. I'll play
any root on the lead sheet. 8-)

S&amp;y

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#11: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-18 04:10:43 by Alan Young

In article &lt;q7Rug.40495$<a href="mailto:No3.38477&#64;newsfe14.lga" target="_blank">No3.38477&#64;newsfe14.lga</a>&gt;, Richard Whitehouse
&lt;<a href="mailto:LuncheonmeatBowl&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">LuncheonmeatBowl&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt; One thing I've noticed is that some bass players have problem reading slash
&gt; chords. I'm not sure why - it should be easy, just read the bottom half of
&gt; the slash. Right? Well, you'd think so, but some lesser players I've
&gt; worked with seem to have a problem with it. So, if I'm writing a chart
&gt; specifically for bass, I'll go out of my way to avoid slash chords, or
&gt; write out the notes. But for a lead sheet, I have no problem with them,
&gt; if they make sense, if they're appropriate.
&gt;
&gt; What do y'all think?

Great topic!
I have mixed feelings here, because as a pianist I sometimes use my
charts playing *over* a bass player, and sometimes I have to cover the
bass voicing myself. And it can get confusing, if the chord voicing is
unfamiliar.

When playing solo (or accompanying a singer), I think of voicing chords
from the bottom up, i.e. left to right on the keyboard. So if the chord
is written with the upper voicing on the left side of the slash (e.g.
E7(#11)/Bb, as is conventional, my left hand immediately tries to go to
the first thing I read. By the time I get past the extensions and see
the bass note, I have to stop and back up --each time. That's really
inefficient. Of course, if the bass player is going to find the Bb,
then it's ideal, because I don't have to think about it.

Now, the solution that occurs to me is to reverse the order of the
information, so the bass note is seen first: Bb\E7#11. But
realistically, when is that going to be agreed on by enough people to
make it an acceptable practice?

--
Alan
<a href="http://www.hummingbear.net/~aayoung/Jazz/jazz.html" target="_blank">http://www.hummingbear.net/~aayoung/Jazz/jazz.html</a>

Damn the rules‹it's the feeling that counts.
You know you're going to use all twelve notes anyway.
‹ Coltrane

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#12: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-18 04:13:06 by tombrown

A lot of responses above fail to acknowlege that a slash chord is not
just a way to write an inversion--it can also be a specific harmonic
color.

For example, the anti-slash-chordites might argue that AMaj/C is just a
complicated way to notate C13(b9). But the truth is that AMaj/C is a
different sound than C13(b9), because it does not contain a Bb or a G.
It is a more transparent harmony, with fewer notes. Thus it is not
equivalent to C13(b9).

Long story short--anyone who tells you to avoid slash chords is giving
you dubious advice, because that person does not understand the concept
of harmonic density (the number of different notes in a given harmony).
Slash chords can be used to notate a more transparent sound than the
traditional style of jazz chord notation gives you.

Report this message

#13: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-18 12:30:59 by David Raleigh Arnold

On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 19:00:45 +0000, Richard Whitehouse wrote:

&gt; Personally, I think they have their place. Lately, I've been hearing
&gt; 'avoid slash chords' from various sources. Is that what's being taught in
&gt; college jazz theory courses these days?

Much less there than meets the eye. Slash chords are a great way to avoid
having to write out a separate bass part. They're also helpful if you are
setting out to write out a aolo arrangement. If you are not interested
and never going to be interested in either of these things, which I
cannot imagine to be the case, then why use them? daveA

--
Free download of technical exercises worth a lifetime of practice:
&quot;Dynamic Guitar Technique&quot;: <a href="http://www.openguitar.com/instruction.html" target="_blank">http://www.openguitar.com/instruction.html</a>
Repertoire and/or licks are ammunition. Tech is a gun.
To email go to: <a href="http://www.openguitar.com/contact.html" target="_blank">http://www.openguitar.com/contact.html</a>

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#14: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-18 18:55:07 by zoot

sure. do it as a game or a challenge like don't let the notes go in the
same direction twice in a row . just don't make it a way of life. why
throw out a good tool?

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#15: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-18 18:56:56 by zoot

Joey Goldstein wrote:

&gt; My right hand only seems to have 1 font available.
&gt; SloppyJoe.fnt.
stopit!!!

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#16: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-19 16:02:33 by Dave M

Don't whether Slash knows any chords beyond 1-5-1.

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#17: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-20 16:07:57 by David Raleigh Arnold

On Mon, 17 Jul 2006 19:10:43 -0700, Alan Young wrote:

&gt; In article &lt;q7Rug.40495$<a href="mailto:No3.38477&#64;newsfe14.lga" target="_blank">No3.38477&#64;newsfe14.lga</a>&gt;, Richard Whitehouse
&gt; &lt;<a href="mailto:LuncheonmeatBowl&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">LuncheonmeatBowl&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt;&gt; One thing I've noticed is that some bass players have problem reading
&gt;&gt; slash chords. I'm not sure why - it should be easy, just read the
&gt;&gt; bottom half of the slash. Right? Well, you'd think so, but some
&gt;&gt; lesser players I've worked with seem to have a problem with it. So, if
&gt;&gt; I'm writing a chart specifically for bass, I'll go out of my way to
&gt;&gt; avoid slash chords, or write out the notes. But for a lead sheet, I
&gt;&gt; have no problem with them, if they make sense, if they're appropriate.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; What do y'all think?
&gt;
&gt; Great topic!
&gt; I have mixed feelings here, because as a pianist I sometimes use my charts
&gt; playing *over* a bass player, and sometimes I have to cover the bass
&gt; voicing myself. And it can get confusing, if the chord voicing is
&gt; unfamiliar.
&gt;
&gt; When playing solo (or accompanying a singer), I think of voicing chords
&gt; from the bottom up, i.e. left to right on the keyboard. So if the chord is
&gt; written with the upper voicing on the left side of the slash (e.g.
&gt; E7(#11)/Bb, as is conventional, my left hand immediately tries to go to
&gt; the first thing I read. By the time I get past the extensions and see the
&gt; bass note, I have to stop and back up --each time. That's really
&gt; inefficient. Of course, if the bass player is going to find the Bb, then
&gt; it's ideal, because I don't have to think about it.
&gt;
&gt; Now, the solution that occurs to me is to reverse the order of the
&gt; information, so the bass note is seen first: Bb\E7#11. But realistically,
&gt; when is that going to be agreed on by enough people to make it an
&gt; acceptable practice?

Never, partly because the chords in root position never need a slash
bass. daveA

--
Free download of technical exercises worth a lifetime of practice:
&quot;Dynamic Guitar Technique&quot;: <a href="http://www.openguitar.com/instruction.html" target="_blank">http://www.openguitar.com/instruction.html</a>
Repertoire and/or licks are ammunition. Tech is a gun.
To email go to: <a href="http://www.openguitar.com/contact.html" target="_blank">http://www.openguitar.com/contact.html</a>

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#18: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-21 05:57:43 by funkifized

&lt;<a href="mailto:tombrown&#64;jhu.edu" target="_blank">tombrown&#64;jhu.edu</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:1153188786.679573.317270&#64;75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1153188786.679573.317270&#64;75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt;
&gt; A lot of responses above fail to acknowlege that a slash chord is not
&gt; just a way to write an inversion--it can also be a specific harmonic
&gt; color.
&gt;
&gt; For example, the anti-slash-chordites might argue that AMaj/C is just a
&gt; complicated way to notate C13(b9). But the truth is that AMaj/C is a
&gt; different sound than C13(b9), because it does not contain a Bb or a G.
&gt; It is a more transparent harmony, with fewer notes. Thus it is not
&gt; equivalent to C13(b9).
&gt;
&gt; Long story short--anyone who tells you to avoid slash chords is giving
&gt; you dubious advice, because that person does not understand the concept
&gt; of harmonic density (the number of different notes in a given harmony).
&gt; Slash chords can be used to notate a more transparent sound than the
&gt; traditional style of jazz chord notation gives you.
&gt;

Funny that David A's advice is right below yours, slandering the same slash
chords that you show to be necessary.

You've shown a great example, which can be furthered: if you see AMaj/C,
what notes are you likely to leave out? Well, the root and 5th are the most
obvious. However, C13(b9) really shows that you need the A and E notes in
the chord in order to define the chord sound. If I'm looking for the A Major
sound, C13(b9) is not going to do it.


--
Mike C.
<a href="http://mikecrutcher.com" target="_blank">http://mikecrutcher.com</a>
Find your voice, and speak it loudly and clearly.
Everything else is really bullshit in the end.
--Larry Carlton

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#19: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-21 08:26:43 by sean

On 7/20/06 8:57 PM, in article <a href="mailto:_OOdndiIpNErzV3ZnZ2dnUVZ_qednZ2d&#64;comcast.com" target="_blank">_OOdndiIpNErzV3ZnZ2dnUVZ_qednZ2d&#64;comcast.com</a>,
&quot;Mike C.&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:Funkifized&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">Funkifized&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt; Funny that David A's advice is right below yours, slandering the same slash
&gt; chords that you show to be necessary.
&gt;
&gt; You've shown a great example, which can be furthered: if you see AMaj/C,
&gt; what notes are you likely to leave out? Well, the root and 5th are the most
&gt; obvious. However, C13(b9) really shows that you need the A and E notes in
&gt; the chord in order to define the chord sound. If I'm looking for the A Major
&gt; sound, C13(b9) is not going to do it.
&gt;

I don't get it. If I saw AMaj/C, I'd play x 3 2 2 2 X.
That yields X C E A C# X.
So the root is in there, in the middle. The 5th is the E, right?
An the C# is the 3rd, so the whole thing is in there, right?

I'm sure I must be missing the point. But maybe there's some utility in
having the Neanderthal come in and grunt the obvious.

Thanks for your patience.

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#20: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-21 09:38:00 by davidjl

&quot;Sean&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:notsean&#64;fake.ca" target="_blank">notsean&#64;fake.ca</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt; &quot;Mike C.&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:Funkifized&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">Funkifized&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt;&gt; Funny that David A's advice is right below yours, slandering the same
&gt;&gt; slash
&gt;&gt; chords that you show to be necessary.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; You've shown a great example, which can be furthered: if you see AMaj/C,
&gt;&gt; what notes are you likely to leave out? Well, the root and 5th are the
&gt;&gt; most
&gt;&gt; obvious. However, C13(b9) really shows that you need the A and E notes in
&gt;&gt; the chord in order to define the chord sound. If I'm looking for the A
&gt;&gt; Major
&gt;&gt; sound, C13(b9) is not going to do it.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;
&gt; I don't get it. If I saw AMaj/C, I'd play x 3 2 2 2 X.
&gt; That yields X C E A C# X.
&gt; So the root is in there, in the middle. The 5th is the E, right?
&gt; An the C# is the 3rd, so the whole thing is in there, right?

I would, too. But a &quot;real guitarist&quot; would probably play 8x66xx. No root and
no fifth.

David J. Littleboy
who's probably dead wrong in
Tokyo, Japan

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#21: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-21 12:06:10 by sean

On 7/21/06 12:38 AM, in article e9q092$lo6$<a href="mailto:1&#64;nnrp.gol.com" target="_blank">1&#64;nnrp.gol.com</a>, &quot;David J.
Littleboy&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:davidjl&#64;gol.com" target="_blank">davidjl&#64;gol.com</a>&gt; wrote:

&gt;
&gt; &quot;Sean&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:notsean&#64;fake.ca" target="_blank">notsean&#64;fake.ca</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;&gt; &quot;Mike C.&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:Funkifized&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">Funkifized&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt;&gt; Funny that David A's advice is right below yours, slandering the same
&gt;&gt;&gt; slash
&gt;&gt;&gt; chords that you show to be necessary.
&gt;&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt;&gt; You've shown a great example, which can be furthered: if you see AMaj/C,
&gt;&gt;&gt; what notes are you likely to leave out? Well, the root and 5th are the
&gt;&gt;&gt; most
&gt;&gt;&gt; obvious. However, C13(b9) really shows that you need the A and E notes in
&gt;&gt;&gt; the chord in order to define the chord sound. If I'm looking for the A
&gt;&gt;&gt; Major
&gt;&gt;&gt; sound, C13(b9) is not going to do it.
&gt;&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; I don't get it. If I saw AMaj/C, I'd play x 3 2 2 2 X.
&gt;&gt; That yields X C E A C# X.
&gt;&gt; So the root is in there, in the middle. The 5th is the E, right?
&gt;&gt; An the C# is the 3rd, so the whole thing is in there, right?
&gt;
&gt; I would, too. But a &quot;real guitarist&quot; would probably play 8x66xx. No root and
&gt; no fifth.

Maaa. Sonna &quot;honmomo no giitaa-isuto&quot; wa sono ten de dooshiomonai n ja nai
ka?

&quot;Up their nose with a rubber hose&quot; to yuu hyoogen ga atta, tiin'eijaa no
toki wa.

Toyuukotowa doodarooka.

(Heta na nihongo de gomen nasai ne.)

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#22: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-21 17:57:27 by Joey Goldstein

Mike C. wrote:
&gt; &lt;<a href="mailto:tombrown&#64;jhu.edu" target="_blank">tombrown&#64;jhu.edu</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt; news:<a href="mailto:1153188786.679573.317270&#64;75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1153188786.679573.317270&#64;75g2000cwc.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt;&gt; A lot of responses above fail to acknowlege that a slash chord is not
&gt;&gt; just a way to write an inversion--it can also be a specific harmonic
&gt;&gt; color.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; For example, the anti-slash-chordites might argue that AMaj/C is just a
&gt;&gt; complicated way to notate C13(b9). But the truth is that AMaj/C is a
&gt;&gt; different sound than C13(b9), because it does not contain a Bb or a G.
&gt;&gt; It is a more transparent harmony, with fewer notes. Thus it is not
&gt;&gt; equivalent to C13(b9).
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Long story short--anyone who tells you to avoid slash chords is giving
&gt;&gt; you dubious advice, because that person does not understand the concept
&gt;&gt; of harmonic density (the number of different notes in a given harmony).
&gt;&gt; Slash chords can be used to notate a more transparent sound than the
&gt;&gt; traditional style of jazz chord notation gives you.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Funny that David A's advice is right below yours, slandering the same slash
&gt; chords that you show to be necessary.
&gt;
&gt; You've shown a great example, which can be furthered: if you see AMaj/C,
&gt; what notes are you likely to leave out? Well, the root and 5th are the most
&gt; obvious. However, C13(b9) really shows that you need the A and E notes in
&gt; the chord in order to define the chord sound. If I'm looking for the A Major
&gt; sound, C13(b9) is not going to do it.

In my experience A/C is almost always functioning as C13b9, except when
it is part of a pedal-tone passage or a constant-structure-harmony
passage. I.e. within some pedal-tone passages or constant-structure
passages it might not be functioning as C13b9.

Most of the times I've seen &quot;A/C&quot; written I've wished the writer would
have written &quot;C13b9&quot; instead, exactly for Tom's reasons, because A/C is
a different sound.

Most players will play an A maj triad above a C7 chord when they see
&quot;C13b9&quot;. Even if they don't, there will most likely be an A maj triad
formed between the voices somewhere within the voicing.

In the event that a writer wants to hear a chord that is functioning as
C13b9, but with the 7th and 5th omitted, then he is pretty much
obligated to use the &quot;A/C&quot; chord symbol because C13b9(no5th,no7th) is
just too unwieldy.

IMO



--
Joey Goldstein
<a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

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#23: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-21 18:34:13 by Joey Goldstein

David J. Littleboy wrote:
&gt; &quot;Sean&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:notsean&#64;fake.ca" target="_blank">notsean&#64;fake.ca</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;&gt; &quot;Mike C.&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:Funkifized&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">Funkifized&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt;&gt; Funny that David A's advice is right below yours, slandering the same
&gt;&gt;&gt; slash
&gt;&gt;&gt; chords that you show to be necessary.
&gt;&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt;&gt; You've shown a great example, which can be furthered: if you see AMaj/C,
&gt;&gt;&gt; what notes are you likely to leave out? Well, the root and 5th are the
&gt;&gt;&gt; most
&gt;&gt;&gt; obvious. However, C13(b9) really shows that you need the A and E notes in
&gt;&gt;&gt; the chord in order to define the chord sound. If I'm looking for the A
&gt;&gt;&gt; Major
&gt;&gt;&gt; sound, C13(b9) is not going to do it.
&gt;&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; I don't get it. If I saw AMaj/C, I'd play x 3 2 2 2 X.
&gt;&gt; That yields X C E A C# X.
&gt;&gt; So the root is in there, in the middle. The 5th is the E, right?
&gt;&gt; An the C# is the 3rd, so the whole thing is in there, right?
&gt;
&gt; I would, too. But a &quot;real guitarist&quot; would probably play 8x66xx. No root and
&gt; no fifth.

Huh?

&quot;A/C&quot; means an A maj triad with C in the bass.

8x66xx is (bottom to top) A G# C#. What's that got to do with any of this?
Maybe you're thinking that the &quot;A&quot; component of the slash chord means
&quot;Amaj7&quot;, and you're omitting the root and 5th of that?

Well...no. That's not how it works.
Even if the chord symbol was just Amaj7 (i.e no slash), you might omit
the 5th, but you wouldn't omit the root unless someone else in the band
was going to play it, like a bass player.

Chordal instruments, especially guitar, always have to be aware of
possible omissions from chords just for practicality's sake, and the 5th
is almost always the 1st to go.
But slash chords have a different logic to them and the least essential
notes are not always as obvious. With most instances o slash chords
omissions should not be used at all if possible. I.e. The intended sound
of the slash chord often depends on all the components being present.

With A/C, if you omit any one of A C# or E you will be losing something
essential about the sound of that chord. If it's functioning as C13b9,
then you're already omitting the 7th (Bb) which *is* an essential part
of that sound. Omitting anything more and the chord runs the risk of
becoming unintelligible. (When I play C13b9 I'd rather omit the 3rd than
the b7.) If I absolutely had to omit something from A/C it'd be the E.

Now, C/D is really D7sus4(9)(no5th). If you leave the 9th out, (E), the
chord's colour might be affected slightly, but not its function within
the progression. If you omit the G or the C you run the risk of losing
the sense of the chord.

Cmaj7/D is really D7sus4(9,13)(no5th). When a writer uses that chord
symbol he usually wants to hear the B. Still, if I had to play a 3 note
voicing for this chord it'd be D G C, i.e. a shell voicing with included
root of D7sus4. But if I sensed that the sus4-ness of the chord wasn't
all that important I might play D C B, i.e. I might omit the G.
But what I wouldn't do is expect that a shell voicing (just the 3rd and
7th) of Cma7 (E &amp; B or B &amp; E), played above a D bass, would fulfil the
requirements of the Cmaj7/D chord symbol.

With some slash chords, of the type where a regular 7th chord is played
above an alternate bass note that isn't a chord tone on the 7th chord
(like Cmaj7/D), a shell voicing of the 7th chord with the root included
(1 3 7, 1 7 3, 3 1 7, 3 7 1, 7 1 3, 7 3 1), sounded above the alternate
bass note, might fulfil the requirements of the slash chord.
I.e. Any of the following combinations of tones, if played above a D
bass, might fulfil the sound of Cmaj7/D:
C E B, C B E, E B C, E C B, B C E, B E C

But that's not always the case.
You always have to use your ears and your taste and your experience on a
situation by situation basis.

--
Joey Goldstein
<a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

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#24: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-21 21:57:41 by Bob Agnew

&gt;
&gt; My right hand only seems to have 1 font available.
&gt; SloppyJoe.fnt.
&gt;

Joey -- Its comforting to know that you have retained your sense of humor
despite all that has transpired here.

&quot;Joey Goldstein&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:nospam&#64;nowhere.net" target="_blank">nospam&#64;nowhere.net</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:e9h69g$qsq$<a href="mailto:2&#64;news.datemas.de..." target="_blank">2&#64;news.datemas.de...</a>
&gt; <a href="mailto:ottguit&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">ottguit&#64;hotmail.com</a> wrote:
&gt;&gt; I could live with slash chordsif the Chord and Bass note were in
&gt;&gt; diefferent fonts, eg Larger Font for Chord and smaller for the Bass.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; I guess I'm slightly dyslexic? If I see Ab/Gb I can easly play Gb/Ab
&gt;&gt; instead, I can't separate the info, not even to play just the chord,
&gt;&gt; maybe if the Fonts were different...
&gt;&gt; Bg
&gt;&gt;
&gt;
&gt; My right hand only seems to have 1 font available.
&gt; SloppyJoe.fnt.
&gt;
&gt; --
&gt; Joey Goldstein
&gt; <a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
&gt; joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

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#25: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-21 22:22:47 by Joey Goldstein

Bob Agnew wrote:
&gt;&gt; My right hand only seems to have 1 font available.
&gt;&gt; SloppyJoe.fnt.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;
&gt; Joey -- Its comforting to know that you have retained your sense of humor
&gt; despite all that has transpired here.

Maybe I'm just to stupid to know what transpired here.
So, what transpired here?




--
Joey Goldstein
<a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

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#26: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-22 02:16:56 by davidjl

&quot;Joey Goldstein&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:nospam&#64;nowhere.net" target="_blank">nospam&#64;nowhere.net</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;
&gt; Well...no. That's not how it works.

That's what I expected...

&gt; Even if the chord symbol was just Amaj7 (i.e no slash), you might omit the
&gt; 5th, but you wouldn't omit the root unless someone else in the band was
&gt; going to play it, like a bass player.
&gt;
&gt; Chordal instruments, especially guitar, always have to be aware of
&gt; possible omissions from chords just for practicality's sake, and the 5th
&gt; is almost always the 1st to go.

Thanks #1.

&gt; But slash chords have a different logic to them and the least essential
&gt; notes are not always as obvious. With most instances o slash chords
&gt; omissions should not be used at all if possible. I.e. The intended sound
&gt; of the slash chord often depends on all the components being present.

Thanks, #2.

&gt; With A/C, if you omit any one of A C# or E you will be losing something
&gt; essential about the sound of that chord. If it's functioning as C13b9,
&gt; then you're already omitting the 7th (Bb) which *is* an essential part of
&gt; that sound. Omitting anything more and the chord runs the risk of becoming
&gt; unintelligible. (When I play C13b9 I'd rather omit the 3rd than the b7.)
&gt; If I absolutely had to omit something from A/C it'd be the E.
&gt;
&gt; Now, C/D is really D7sus4(9)(no5th). If you leave the 9th out, (E), the
&gt; chord's colour might be affected slightly, but not its function within the
&gt; progression. If you omit the G or the C you run the risk of losing the
&gt; sense of the chord.
&gt;
&gt; Cmaj7/D is really D7sus4(9,13)(no5th). When a writer uses that chord
&gt; symbol he usually wants to hear the B. Still, if I had to play a 3 note
&gt; voicing for this chord it'd be D G C, i.e. a shell voicing with included
&gt; root of D7sus4. But if I sensed that the sus4-ness of the chord wasn't all
&gt; that important I might play D C B, i.e. I might omit the G.
&gt; But what I wouldn't do is expect that a shell voicing (just the 3rd and
&gt; 7th) of Cma7 (E &amp; B or B &amp; E), played above a D bass, would fulfil the
&gt; requirements of the Cmaj7/D chord symbol.
&gt;
&gt; With some slash chords, of the type where a regular 7th chord is played
&gt; above an alternate bass note that isn't a chord tone on the 7th chord
&gt; (like Cmaj7/D), a shell voicing of the 7th chord with the root included (1
&gt; 3 7, 1 7 3, 3 1 7, 3 7 1, 7 1 3, 7 3 1), sounded above the alternate bass
&gt; note, might fulfil the requirements of the slash chord.
&gt; I.e. Any of the following combinations of tones, if played above a D bass,
&gt; might fulfil the sound of Cmaj7/D:
&gt; C E B, C B E, E B C, E C B, B C E, B E C
&gt;
&gt; But that's not always the case.
&gt; You always have to use your ears and your taste and your experience on a
&gt; situation by situation basis.

I sat in with a big band (5 saxes, 3 trumpets, trombone) for the first time
the other day, and saw lots of slash chords. The pianist was playing much
more sparsely than the pianists in the smaller groups I sit in with. My
understanding was that in that context, 2 or 3 note &quot;chords&quot; is what is
called for.

Anyway, the points that (a) if it doesn't specifically say &quot;7&quot; it really
doesn't want a 7th, and (b) try not to omit (the other) notes from slash
chords sound like a good start.

David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan

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#27: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-22 03:38:41 by mwsmart

Dave M wrote:
&gt; Don't whether Slash knows any chords beyond 1-5-1.

Dang, you beat me to it!

Mark Smart
<a href="http://www.marksmart.net" target="_blank">http://www.marksmart.net</a>

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#28: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-22 06:50:52 by Joey Goldstein

David J. Littleboy wrote:
&gt; &quot;Joey Goldstein&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:nospam&#64;nowhere.net" target="_blank">nospam&#64;nowhere.net</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;&gt; Well...no. That's not how it works.
&gt;
&gt; That's what I expected...
&gt;
&gt;&gt; Even if the chord symbol was just Amaj7 (i.e no slash), you might omit the
&gt;&gt; 5th, but you wouldn't omit the root unless someone else in the band was
&gt;&gt; going to play it, like a bass player.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Chordal instruments, especially guitar, always have to be aware of
&gt;&gt; possible omissions from chords just for practicality's sake, and the 5th
&gt;&gt; is almost always the 1st to go.
&gt;
&gt; Thanks #1.
&gt;
&gt;&gt; But slash chords have a different logic to them and the least essential
&gt;&gt; notes are not always as obvious. With most instances o slash chords
&gt;&gt; omissions should not be used at all if possible. I.e. The intended sound
&gt;&gt; of the slash chord often depends on all the components being present.
&gt;
&gt; Thanks, #2.
&gt;
&gt;&gt; With A/C, if you omit any one of A C# or E you will be losing something
&gt;&gt; essential about the sound of that chord. If it's functioning as C13b9,
&gt;&gt; then you're already omitting the 7th (Bb) which *is* an essential part of
&gt;&gt; that sound. Omitting anything more and the chord runs the risk of becoming
&gt;&gt; unintelligible. (When I play C13b9 I'd rather omit the 3rd than the b7.)
&gt;&gt; If I absolutely had to omit something from A/C it'd be the E.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Now, C/D is really D7sus4(9)(no5th). If you leave the 9th out, (E), the
&gt;&gt; chord's colour might be affected slightly, but not its function within the
&gt;&gt; progression. If you omit the G or the C you run the risk of losing the
&gt;&gt; sense of the chord.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; Cmaj7/D is really D7sus4(9,13)(no5th). When a writer uses that chord
&gt;&gt; symbol he usually wants to hear the B. Still, if I had to play a 3 note
&gt;&gt; voicing for this chord it'd be D G C, i.e. a shell voicing with included
&gt;&gt; root of D7sus4. But if I sensed that the sus4-ness of the chord wasn't all
&gt;&gt; that important I might play D C B, i.e. I might omit the G.
&gt;&gt; But what I wouldn't do is expect that a shell voicing (just the 3rd and
&gt;&gt; 7th) of Cma7 (E &amp; B or B &amp; E), played above a D bass, would fulfil the
&gt;&gt; requirements of the Cmaj7/D chord symbol.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; With some slash chords, of the type where a regular 7th chord is played
&gt;&gt; above an alternate bass note that isn't a chord tone on the 7th chord
&gt;&gt; (like Cmaj7/D), a shell voicing of the 7th chord with the root included (1
&gt;&gt; 3 7, 1 7 3, 3 1 7, 3 7 1, 7 1 3, 7 3 1), sounded above the alternate bass
&gt;&gt; note, might fulfil the requirements of the slash chord.
&gt;&gt; I.e. Any of the following combinations of tones, if played above a D bass,
&gt;&gt; might fulfil the sound of Cmaj7/D:
&gt;&gt; C E B, C B E, E B C, E C B, B C E, B E C
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; But that's not always the case.
&gt;&gt; You always have to use your ears and your taste and your experience on a
&gt;&gt; situation by situation basis.
&gt;
&gt; I sat in with a big band (5 saxes, 3 trumpets, trombone) for the first time
&gt; the other day, and saw lots of slash chords. The pianist was playing much
&gt; more sparsely than the pianists in the smaller groups I sit in with. My
&gt; understanding was that in that context, 2 or 3 note &quot;chords&quot; is what is
&gt; called for.

In a big the comping instrument(s) have to get out of the way of the big
chords that are voiced across the all those horns. The chord symbols
tell only a very small part of the story. You have to listen to the lead
lines and play just like you would if you were backing up a busy singer.

&gt; Anyway, the points that (a) if it doesn't specifically say &quot;7&quot; it really
&gt; doesn't want a 7th,

Not necessarily true. I don't know where you got that from or in what
context you're applying it to.
If a chart just says &quot;C&quot;, there's a real good chance that Cmaj7 will be
appropriate, unless a high C is also the melody (But even then Cmaj7
might sound good.)
In many jazz chord charts, &quot;C&quot; as opposed to &quot;Cmaj7&quot; would be used to
indicate that C is the melody note as well.

&gt; and (b) try not to omit (the other) notes from slash
&gt; chords sound like a good start.

And if you simply can't play them all use your ears to tell you what the
best omissions are.

--
Joey Goldstein
<a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

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#29: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-22 08:51:35 by davidjl

&quot;Joey Goldstein&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:nospam&#64;nowhere.net" target="_blank">nospam&#64;nowhere.net</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt; David J. Littleboy wrote:
&gt;&gt; &quot;Joey Goldstein&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:nospam&#64;nowhere.net" target="_blank">nospam&#64;nowhere.net</a>&gt; wrote:
&gt;&gt;&gt; Well...no. That's not how it works.
&gt;&gt;
&gt;&gt; That's what I expected...
&gt;
&gt;&gt; Anyway, the points that (a) if it doesn't specifically say &quot;7&quot; it really
&gt;&gt; doesn't want a 7th,

Oops: I meant &quot;If a _SLASH_ chord doesn't say &quot;7&quot;....

&gt; Not necessarily true. I don't know where you got that from or in what
&gt; context you're applying it to.

Uh, I thought that's what you said about slash chords. Yes, I know that lots
of charts leave out the 7th (and other color) indications.

&gt; If a chart just says &quot;C&quot;, there's a real good chance that Cmaj7 will be
&gt; appropriate, unless a high C is also the melody (But even then Cmaj7 might
&gt; sound good.)
&gt; In many jazz chord charts, &quot;C&quot; as opposed to &quot;Cmaj7&quot; would be used to
&gt; indicate that C is the melody note as well.
&gt;
&gt;&gt; and (b) try not to omit (the other) notes from slash chords sound like a
&gt;&gt; good start.
&gt;
&gt; And if you simply can't play them all use your ears to tell you what the
&gt; best omissions are.

You make overly optimistic assumptions about my ears...

David J. Littleboy
Tokyo, Japan

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#30: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-22 15:18:42 by Jack Zucker

&quot;Joey Goldstein&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:nospam&#64;nowhere.net" target="_blank">nospam&#64;nowhere.net</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:e9qtha$nf0$<a href="mailto:1&#64;news.datemas.de..." target="_blank">1&#64;news.datemas.de...</a>
&gt;
&gt; In my experience A/C is almost always functioning as C13b9, except when it
&gt; is part of a pedal-tone passage or a constant-structure-harmony passage.
&gt; I.e. within some pedal-tone passages or constant-structure passages it
&gt; might not be functioning as C13b9.

Man, you are right-on as usual. Do you talk about this in your book? I can't
remember.

At any rate, I love using slash chords in pedal-tones such as:

|: Bb/C | A/C | Bb/C | B/C :|

Trying to notate this using standard chord symbols is silly and anyone who
says otherwise certainly doesn't understand the concept of slash chords.

I would invite folks who are anti-slash chords to transcribe some older
Liebman, Abercrombie, Bierach stuff to get a feel for this type of harmonic
structure.

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#31: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-22 18:27:42 by Joey Goldstein

Jack A. Zucker wrote:
&gt; Do you talk about this in your book?

Actually, I don't think I touch on slash chords at all.


--
Joey Goldstein
<a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

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#32: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-22 19:13:56 by Jack Zucker

&quot;Joey Goldstein&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:nospam&#64;nowhere.net" target="_blank">nospam&#64;nowhere.net</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:e9tjm0$pff$<a href="mailto:1&#64;news.datemas.de..." target="_blank">1&#64;news.datemas.de...</a>
&gt; Jack A. Zucker wrote:
&gt;&gt; Do you talk about this in your book?
&gt;
&gt; Actually, I don't think I touch on slash chords at all.

That's too bad. I need some instructional material for students and don't
have time to write out something formal. I'll have to search google, I
guess...

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#33: Re: Slash chords: yes or no?

Posted on 2006-07-22 21:01:37 by zoot

Jack A. Zucker wrote
&gt; I would invite folks who are anti-slash chords to transcribe some older
&gt; Liebman, Abercrombie, Bierach stuff to get a feel for this type of harmonic
&gt; structure.


or describe the tag on the firebird without slashes. how could you even
know there is a pedal not to mention the energy it brings.

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