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#1: Straight Rhythm chords

Posted on 2006-07-23 20:02:44 by Kent Murdick

This was brought up on another list but I thought I'd throw it to you
experts. One guy said you could play anything with six fingerings. I
think it takes seven. Also, you might need two inversions of the
minor triad ( you already have 1st inversion monor triad)

All the fingerings are on the 6th, 4th and 3rd strings only. I
don't like to chop chords where the bass is on the 5th string because
you lose some freedom.

I think you can get them all with these. Starting from the 6th string.


5X44 5X35 5X46 5X56 5X45 5X36 5X55

This gives you ii, V7 I in all inversions plus an augmented triad. V7
Altered 5th chords can be substituted with chords bult on the b5.
The Minor b5 is there in all
inversions too. Minor-Maj 7 is there in the augmented chord. Have I
got them all? The object is to never have to move more than two
frets to get to the next chord.

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#2: Re: Straight Rhythm chords

Posted on 2006-07-23 20:46:24 by sgcim

Kent Murdick wrote:
> This was brought up on another list but I thought I'd throw it to you
> experts. One guy said you could play anything with six fingerings. I
> think it takes seven. Also, you might need two inversions of the
> minor triad ( you already have 1st inversion monor triad)
>
> All the fingerings are on the 6th, 4th and 3rd strings only. I
> don't like to chop chords where the bass is on the 5th string because
> you lose some freedom.
>
> I think you can get them all with these. Starting from the 6th string.
>
>
> 5X44 5X35 5X46 5X56 5X45 5X36 5X55
>
> This gives you ii, V7 I in all inversions plus an augmented triad. V7
> Altered 5th chords can be substituted with chords bult on the b5.
> The Minor b5 is there in all
> inversions too. Minor-Maj 7 is there in the augmented chord. Have I
> got them all? The object is to never have to move more than two
> frets to get to the next chord.
You might as well have the root position maj7 too( although you do have
the maj7 in 2nd inversion)
5x66
With more inversions and root position fingerings, it's easier to
accomplish your goal of only having to move 2 frets for chord changes.
Another root pos. chord you don't have is the minor chord with a maj7:
5X65.
This is a troublesome chord when used in the classic big band arr. by
Earl Hagen for the famous "Harlem Nocturne".
You do have the first inversion of that chord 5X36, but again, the more
inversions and root positions you have, the easier it is to find
fingerings close by.
Another inversion that can be troublesome to find on a fast tempo
chart would be a second inversion major triad:
5X47
And add to that is the equally pesky minor triad in 2nd inversion:
5X37
Then there are also slash chords in many charts (even the swing charts
that these voicings are the most desirable ones to use) E/A:
5X64
These are not as esoteric as they may seem, I've got 12 big band gigs
where they have a pianist and my main function in all the swing charts
is doing this.

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#3: Re: Straight Rhythm chords

Posted on 2006-07-23 20:57:52 by Patrick Hanrahan

Have I
> got them all? The object is to never have to move more than two
> frets to get to the next chord.
>
I'm no Expert. and I'm not sure I get what your asking. Are you asking if
this list you posted:
5X44 5X35 5X46 5X56 5X45 5X36 5X55
are all the A min Shell voicings [ Root, 3rd and 7th ] ?
cause I'm not see the ii V you mention. What key are you in?

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#4: Re: Straight Rhythm chords

Posted on 2006-07-23 21:52:53 by Kent Murdick

Of course I use about 10 or twelve more fingerings - "grips", as the
old guys would say - if I'm actually doing this. The question is
this, can one play any big band chart with seven fingerings and not
move more than two frets? Let me take your objections one at a time.

1) The minor-Major 7th is there in the augmented triad and that triad
repeats every four frets, so the farthest away you can get from any
minor-Maj 7th chord is two frets.

2) I would use 5X46 for a 2nd inversion major chord.

3) The minor in 2nd inversion is 5X35 (d minor 7th).

4) You say: "Another inversion that can be troublesome to find on a
fast tempo
chart would be a second inversion major triad:5X47"
But I do have 5X46 which is easier to play than 5X47 at fast speeds ( I
guess) and I'm trying to minimize the number of fingerings. BTW, this
is an intellectual game that might have some practical use.


My big concern is the tonic minor when a minor 7th can't be used.
Take "It Don't Mean a Thing (if it aint got that swing)". OK, it's
solidly in G minor. Now it sounds fine to me to play Gm7/// ////
D#7/D7/ Gm7. but if I were playing in a big band I would use just G
minor. Am I being overly cautious? I guess the question is is there
ever a time, in say G minor, when Gmin7 or Bb aug woudn't work and you
would have to play just G minor triad?

So in summary, two questions since I've found my expert.

1) Can one play any big band chart with seven fingerings and not move
more than two frets? I think it's true!

2) Is is there ever a time, in say G minor, when Gmin7 or Bb aug
woudn't work and you would have to play just G minor triad?


<a href="mailto:sgcim&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">sgcim&#64;hotmail.com</a> wrote:
&gt; Kent Murdick wrote:
&gt; &gt; This was brought up on another list but I thought I'd throw it to you
&gt; &gt; experts. One guy said you could play anything with six fingerings. I
&gt; &gt; think it takes seven. Also, you might need two inversions of the
&gt; &gt; minor triad ( you already have 1st inversion monor triad)
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; All the fingerings are on the 6th, 4th and 3rd strings only. I
&gt; &gt; don't like to chop chords where the bass is on the 5th string because
&gt; &gt; you lose some freedom.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; I think you can get them all with these. Starting from the 6th string.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; 5X44 5X35 5X46 5X56 5X45 5X36 5X55
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; This gives you ii, V7 I in all inversions plus an augmented triad. V7
&gt; &gt; Altered 5th chords can be substituted with chords bult on the b5.
&gt; &gt; The Minor b5 is there in all
&gt; &gt; inversions too. Minor-Maj 7 is there in the augmented chord. Have I
&gt; &gt; got them all? The object is to never have to move more than two
&gt; &gt; frets to get to the next chord.
&gt; You might as well have the root position maj7 too( although you do have
&gt; the maj7 in 2nd inversion)
&gt; 5x66
&gt; With more inversions and root position fingerings, it's easier to
&gt; accomplish your goal of only having to move 2 frets for chord changes.
&gt; Another root pos. chord you don't have is the minor chord with a maj7:
&gt; 5X65.
&gt; This is a troublesome chord when used in the classic big band arr. by
&gt; Earl Hagen for the famous &quot;Harlem Nocturne&quot;.
&gt; You do have the first inversion of that chord 5X36, but again, the more
&gt; inversions and root positions you have, the easier it is to find
&gt; fingerings close by.
&gt; Another inversion that can be troublesome to find on a fast tempo
&gt; chart would be a second inversion major triad:
&gt; 5X47
&gt; And add to that is the equally pesky minor triad in 2nd inversion:
&gt; 5X37
&gt; Then there are also slash chords in many charts (even the swing charts
&gt; that these voicings are the most desirable ones to use) E/A:
&gt; 5X64
&gt; These are not as esoteric as they may seem, I've got 12 big band gigs
&gt; where they have a pianist and my main function in all the swing charts
&gt; is doing this.

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#5: Re: Straight Rhythm chords

Posted on 2006-07-24 00:29:37 by Kid Kool

Kent Murdick wrote:
&gt;
&gt; I think you can get them all with these. Starting from the 6th string.
&gt;
&gt;
&gt; 5X44 5X35 5X46 5X56 5X45 5X36 5X55
&gt;
&gt; got them all? The object is to never have to move more than two
&gt; frets to get to the next chord.

Why? What's the point?

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#6: Re: Straight Rhythm chords

Posted on 2006-07-24 01:37:33 by Kent Murdick

&gt;&gt;&gt;Kid Kool wrote:
Why? What's the point?&gt;&gt;&gt;

To see if could be done. It may also have a practical purpose.
Suppose a High School jazz band needed a rhythm guitar and only had a
non-reading rocker. There might be a way to tab the rhythm chart out
for him which would be easier if he only had to learn seven chords.
Sounds like a nice article. Maybe I'll write it up.

Kid Kool wrote:
&gt; Kent Murdick wrote:
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; I think you can get them all with these. Starting from the 6th string.
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; 5X44 5X35 5X46 5X56 5X45 5X36 5X55
&gt; &gt;
&gt; &gt; got them all? The object is to never have to move more than two
&gt; &gt; frets to get to the next chord.
&gt;
&gt; Why? What's the point?

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