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#1: Re: L.A. Times on protest songs

Posted on 2006-07-13 00:48:43 by j_nscott

[=2E..] When Young recently stated that he made the album "Living
> With War" because no younger artists were picking up the
> countercultural torch, he unfortunately associated his efforts with a
> generational attitude that drives Generations X and Y crazy. "It's a
> clich=E9d Rolling Stone boomer-idea, that pop culture managed to stop a
> war, that musicians once had power as galvanizing figures," wrote
> twentysomething blogger Tom Breihan in a May 17 Village Voice column
> decrying such views.

I agree with Breihan as far as stopping the war is concerned -- e.g., I
think McCartney's notion that "Give Peace A Chance" played a
significant role in ending the war is wishful thinking -- but I think
musicians did have power as galvanizing figures regarding, e.g., the
acceptance of cannabis use.

>
> Folk music has always been topical, of course, as has its more
> politically conservative sister, country

But how much does "topical" translate over to "political" (or "visceral
opinions," see below)? People like Woody mostly invented the idea of
"folk" as "political"; before Woody's era the typical topical folk or
"hillbilly" song (about a tragic train wreck, dancing all night with a
bottle in your hand, or whatever) had little political content.
"Hillbilly" music of the '20s-'50s was topical (whether about pistol
packin' mamas, hot rods, or whatever) far, far more often than it was
political.

- one reason, as Chris
> Willman explains in his fine book on country music politics, "Rednecks
> & Bluenecks," that Nashville's Bush supporters (and rebel voices like
> Steve Earle and Merle Haggard) were way ahead of the curve when it came
> to offering visceral opinions of current events.
[=2E..]

Artists are addressing "serious"
> issues as a matter of course and not worrying about the consequences.

I'd think sometimes they're aware that the consequences could include
attracting more fans. E.g., I've never had much interest in Green Day,
and political lyrics could be a way Green Day could be seen as
"relevant" to me or someone else thereby prolonging Green Day's career.

> Are these artists just preaching to whatever choir prefers them?

Usually, of course. Natalie found out she wasn't, much as, I suppose,
Neil found out he wasn't back when he was going around praising Reagan
and his albums were dropping way off in sales.

Joseph Scott

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#2: Re: L.A. Times on protest songs

Posted on 2006-07-13 08:39:11 by William Black

&lt;<a href="mailto:j_nscott&#64;msn.com" target="_blank">j_nscott&#64;msn.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:1152744523.851869.63440&#64;m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152744523.851869.63440&#64;m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...</a>
[...] When Young recently stated that he made the album &quot;Living
&gt; With War&quot; because no younger artists were picking up the
&gt; countercultural torch, he unfortunately associated his efforts with a
&gt; generational attitude that drives Generations X and Y crazy. &quot;It's a
&gt; clichéd Rolling Stone boomer-idea, that pop culture managed to stop a
&gt; war, that musicians once had power as galvanizing figures,&quot; wrote
&gt; twentysomething blogger Tom Breihan in a May 17 Village Voice column
&gt; decrying such views.

Did the Rolling Stones ever espouse any particularly anti-war ideas?

I don't remember them ever being political in any way much at all, they're
all nice middle class boys from South London...

--
William Black

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Barbeques on fire by the chalets past the castle headland
I watched the gift shops glitter in the darkness off the Newborough gate
All these moments will be lost in time, like icecream on the beach
Time for tea.

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#3: Re: L.A. Times on protest songs

Posted on 2006-07-13 20:44:02 by j_nscott

William Black wrote:
&gt; &lt;<a href="mailto:j_nscott&#64;msn.com" target="_blank">j_nscott&#64;msn.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt; news:<a href="mailto:1152744523.851869.63440&#64;m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152744523.851869.63440&#64;m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt; [...] When Young recently stated that he made the album &quot;Living
&gt; &gt; With War&quot; because no younger artists were picking up the
&gt; &gt; countercultural torch, he unfortunately associated his efforts with a
&gt; &gt; generational attitude that drives Generations X and Y crazy. &quot;It's a
&gt; &gt; clich=E9d Rolling Stone boomer-idea, that pop culture managed to stop a
&gt; &gt; war, that musicians once had power as galvanizing figures,&quot; wrote
&gt; &gt; twentysomething blogger Tom Breihan in a May 17 Village Voice column
&gt; &gt; decrying such views.
&gt;
&gt; Did the Rolling Stones ever espouse any particularly anti-war ideas?
&gt;
&gt; I don't remember them ever being political in any way much at all, they'=
re
&gt; all nice middle class boys from South London...

I think Breihan was referring to Rolling Stone magazine, which has been
a pretty reliable source of lowest-common-denominator mythology about
rock history over the years.

Joseph Scott

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#4: Re: L.A. Times on protest songs

Posted on 2006-07-13 21:12:05 by William Black

&lt;<a href="mailto:j_nscott&#64;msn.com" target="_blank">j_nscott&#64;msn.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:1152816242.579902.245320&#64;i42g2000cwa.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152816242.579902.245320&#64;i42g2000cwa.googlegroups.com...</a>

William Black wrote:
&gt; &lt;<a href="mailto:j_nscott&#64;msn.com" target="_blank">j_nscott&#64;msn.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
&gt; news:<a href="mailto:1152744523.851869.63440&#64;m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1152744523.851869.63440&#64;m73g2000cwd.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt; [...] When Young recently stated that he made the album &quot;Living
&gt; &gt; With War&quot; because no younger artists were picking up the
&gt; &gt; countercultural torch, he unfortunately associated his efforts with a
&gt; &gt; generational attitude that drives Generations X and Y crazy. &quot;It's a
&gt; &gt; clichéd Rolling Stone boomer-idea, that pop culture managed to stop a
&gt; &gt; war, that musicians once had power as galvanizing figures,&quot; wrote
&gt; &gt; twentysomething blogger Tom Breihan in a May 17 Village Voice column
&gt; &gt; decrying such views.
&gt;
&gt; Did the Rolling Stones ever espouse any particularly anti-war ideas?
&gt;
&gt; I don't remember them ever being political in any way much at all,
they're
&gt; all nice middle class boys from South London...

I think Breihan was referring to Rolling Stone magazine, which has been
a pretty reliable source of lowest-common-denominator mythology about
rock history over the years.

---------------

Goodness is that rag still being published?

It was considered 'well written and laid out, but rubbish' thirty five years
ago in the UK.

--
William Black

I've seen things you people wouldn't believe.
Barbeques on fire by the chalets past the castle headland
I watched the gift shops glitter in the darkness off the Newborough gate
All these moments will be lost in time, like icecream on the beach
Time for tea.

Report this message