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#1: All Of You - Analysis

Posted on 2005-12-24 13:02:03 by njsteve

Hi,

I'm working my way every so slowly through a nice chord melody
arrangement of the tune All Of You by Cole Porter.

In my efforts to speed up the time it takes me to learn a new chord
melody arrangement I decided it might be a good idea to take a look at
the chords and try and figure out what is going on instead of just
trying to muscle my way through the tune.

So right out of the gate I am a little stumped. Abm9, Bb13(b9),
Ebmaj7. I love the sound of this progression and it kind of reminds me
of the way a ii V I sounds but the minor iv chord has me perplexed.
The same note that makes the Ab minor is also the flat 9 for the V
chord. That note is Cb. Looking at this from a modal point of view I
just don't get it. This progressions seems to be built on an Eb Major
scale with a flat 6 and that is not something I am familiar with.

So how would you categorize this progression? Is it iv, V7, I ? What
scales would you use to solo over this progressions? Ab melodic minor
sounds interesting when played over the Abm9.

I'd appreciate any feedback on this seemingly simple progression.

Thanks in advance,
Steve

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#2: Re: All Of You - Analysis

Posted on 2005-12-24 13:56:18 by Keith Freeman

> Abm9, Bb13(b9), Ebmaj7.
The chart starts with the Bb7. I presume the Abm7 is for the pickup? The
normal chord there would be Fm7 (=Bb7sus): by taking it up a minor 3rd the
arranger has effectively made it into a Bb7sus alt.

As for scales, you don't need 'em, you need the chord notes: anything in
between is either a passing note or an appoggiatura and can be diatonic (in
this case to Eb) or chromatic.

-Keith

Portable Changes, tips etc. at <a href="http://home.wanadoo.nl/keith.freeman/" target="_blank">http://home.wanadoo.nl/keith.freeman/</a>
e-mail only to keith DOT freeman AT wanadoo DOT nl

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#3: Re: All Of You - Analysis

Posted on 2005-12-24 13:59:13 by Jack Zucker

haha - I thought this was another shot at &quot;group&quot; analysis. :-)

--
Experience a revolutionary way to approach the instrument.
Introducing Sheets of Sound for Guitar
&quot;Let the music govern the way you play guitar instead of the guitar
governing the way you play music!&quot;

Check it out at:
<a href="http://www.sheetsofsound.net" target="_blank">http://www.sheetsofsound.net</a>
&quot;njsteve&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:szeik&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">szeik&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:1135422597.763078.148770&#64;o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1135422597.763078.148770&#64;o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt; Hi,
&gt;
&gt; I'm working my way every so slowly through a nice chord melody
&gt; arrangement of the tune All Of You by Cole Porter.
&gt;
&gt; In my efforts to speed up the time it takes me to learn a new chord
&gt; melody arrangement I decided it might be a good idea to take a look at
&gt; the chords and try and figure out what is going on instead of just
&gt; trying to muscle my way through the tune.
&gt;
&gt; So right out of the gate I am a little stumped. Abm9, Bb13(b9),
&gt; Ebmaj7. I love the sound of this progression and it kind of reminds me
&gt; of the way a ii V I sounds but the minor iv chord has me perplexed.
&gt; The same note that makes the Ab minor is also the flat 9 for the V
&gt; chord. That note is Cb. Looking at this from a modal point of view I
&gt; just don't get it. This progressions seems to be built on an Eb Major
&gt; scale with a flat 6 and that is not something I am familiar with.
&gt;
&gt; So how would you categorize this progression? Is it iv, V7, I ? What
&gt; scales would you use to solo over this progressions? Ab melodic minor
&gt; sounds interesting when played over the Abm9.
&gt;
&gt; I'd appreciate any feedback on this seemingly simple progression.
&gt;
&gt; Thanks in advance,
&gt; Steve
&gt;

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#4: Re: All Of You - Analysis

Posted on 2005-12-24 14:43:04 by nospam

Steve,

Ab minor in key of Eb Major is categorized as a subdominant minor or
something like that. So you are right - it is a iv, V7, I.
There are probably a few other standards with similar.
&quot;A Child Is Born&quot; comes to mind.

It leaves you with a wealth chords to choose from -
Db7, Gbmaj7, EMaj7 to name a few.
If you put an F in the bass, then you get a
F-7b5 to Bb7 progression...

Keith Jarret has a great version of this tunes on his
standards vol.1.

Regards,
bruce



&quot;njsteve&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:szeik&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">szeik&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:1135422597.763078.148770&#64;o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1135422597.763078.148770&#64;o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt; Hi,
&gt;
&gt; I'm working my way every so slowly through a nice chord melody
&gt; arrangement of the tune All Of You by Cole Porter.
&gt;
&gt; In my efforts to speed up the time it takes me to learn a new chord
&gt; melody arrangement I decided it might be a good idea to take a look at
&gt; the chords and try and figure out what is going on instead of just
&gt; trying to muscle my way through the tune.
&gt;
&gt; So right out of the gate I am a little stumped. Abm9, Bb13(b9),
&gt; Ebmaj7. I love the sound of this progression and it kind of reminds me
&gt; of the way a ii V I sounds but the minor iv chord has me perplexed.
&gt; The same note that makes the Ab minor is also the flat 9 for the V
&gt; chord. That note is Cb. Looking at this from a modal point of view I
&gt; just don't get it. This progressions seems to be built on an Eb Major
&gt; scale with a flat 6 and that is not something I am familiar with.
&gt;
&gt; So how would you categorize this progression? Is it iv, V7, I ? What
&gt; scales would you use to solo over this progressions? Ab melodic minor
&gt; sounds interesting when played over the Abm9.
&gt;
&gt; I'd appreciate any feedback on this seemingly simple progression.
&gt;
&gt; Thanks in advance,
&gt; Steve
&gt;

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#5: Re: All Of You - Analysis

Posted on 2005-12-24 15:23:55 by Rick Ross

&quot;njsteve&quot; &lt;<a href="mailto:szeik&#64;hotmail.com" target="_blank">szeik&#64;hotmail.com</a>&gt; wrote in message
news:<a href="mailto:1135422597.763078.148770&#64;o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com..." target="_blank">1135422597.763078.148770&#64;o13g2000cwo.googlegroups.com...</a>
&gt; Hi,
&gt;
&gt; I'm working my way every so slowly through a nice chord melody
&gt; arrangement of the tune All Of You by Cole Porter.
&gt;

IV minor is a strong path to the tonic...e.g . headed to C you could dance
over Dm (for G7)..has the b9 which is adored by many..Abm9 to Bb7

ab.....7th
f......5
b........b9
eb......4/11
bb...root

makes sense why it sounds jazzy

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#6: Re: All Of You - Analysis

Posted on 2005-12-24 18:38:52 by Dan Adler

Abm6 == Fm7b5

-Dan
<a href="http://danadler.com" target="_blank">http://danadler.com</a>

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#7: Re: All Of You - Analysis

Posted on 2005-12-24 18:39:21 by jurupari

haha - I thought this was another shot at &quot;group&quot; analysis. :-)
-------------------------------

crossed my mind too!

I thought I'd answer the question though
----------------------------
So right out of the gate I am a little stumped. Abm9, Bb13(b9),
Ebmaj7. I love the sound of this progression and it kind of reminds me

of the way a ii V I sounds but the minor iv chord has me perplexed.
------------------------------------------------------------ -

Well, that's 'cause it is.

It's a tritone sub of a 'secondary dominant'. It is 2-5, but it's
displaced to a secondary root that's still in the key of Eb.

It's the same change as in a lot of songs in that spot or close - I'm
thinking Billy Joel's Just the way you are, or April in Paris, but it's
literally everywhere if you look at the entire song - all the things
you are, donna lee, about anywhere.
---------------------------------------------------

The same note that makes the Ab minor is also the flat 9 for the V
chord. That note is Cb. Looking at this from a modal point of view I
just don't get it.
------------------------------------------------------------ -----

Then stop looking at this from a modal point of view.

You shouldn't - It's not modal, this is a chord progression, so GIGO
----------------------------------------

This progressions seems to be built on an Eb Major
scale with a flat 6 and that is not something I am familiar with.
------------------------------------------------------------ -

I just think of it as being in 3 flats. Then once I have the key, I
look at the progression relative to the root if I need to do that.

This one's a no brainer for me since I've been playing standards with
the same change in them literally thousands of times for decades, so
the sound is about as burned in as the melody of Happy Birthday in my
brain. If you say the names, I can make the sound happen.

So here's the deal - a simple pathway to the Abmi or 4minor in this
song.

First think of the diatonic chord scale like the white keys in C

Next think of a Dominant at 3 and not a minor.

Think of all the songs that have this substitution to tertian harmony -
it's everywhere - La Fiesta Someday My Prince, Confirmation, Georgia On
My Mind, literally everywhere - one of the commonest changes in music.

Now think of the altered upper structure of the 3 dominant and its
tritone substitute here in Eb:

That's G7(with one or more of #/b 9/5) and Db13#11.

If you take the minor backcycle of that Db chord, it's Abminor.

This sound is reinforced by the upper structure of the G7 dominant -
It's also equal to Ab minor, and we all know the Ab melodic minor scale
is a good toneset to outline these tones, regardless of where in them
the bass and other notes happen to be residing in the musical moment.

Some of us also know the C harmonic minor toneset is also all good in
these circumstances, either to extend the chords or to make lines.

When I was studying with Jerry Coker, he showed me the benefit of
setting up a *permanent* and *moveable* 2-5 architecture that was
completely self-referencing, and unchanging so you could learn the
sound AS A UNIT and put it where you want.

It's showing up here beautifully, of course.

Usually 4 minor doesn't go directly to 5, but if you look at Ab minor
as tones of Bb7, you'll see it's really just another way of making the
5 chord happen.

You're going from a suspended Bb dominant with Abmimaj13 or whatever to
a Bb dominant with the 4th resolved.

So, if you get in Eb

Dm7b5 - G7alt- Abmimaj13-Db13#11, it's part of a moveable complex that
sounds good wherever you have a dominant or secondary dominant. I used
the maxxed out extensions there to name things, but you can back off
any or all of them if you want.

Here it's a 4 minor sound, and it's integrated with the 3 dominant
sound, but of course can move to another secondary position and fit the
music.

So 7m7b5, 4 minor, 3 dominant and b713#11 are all part of the same
beastie and will swap out to make new sounds out of the same
components.

And you should move it to the other places it will help you identify
progressions by ear:

Try it at 1dominant, 5 dominant, 6 dominant and 7 dominant, and you'll
hear what I mean.

And note where the minors and tritone subs fall. All 12 tones can be
involved as roots as you'll notice.

It should occur to you that it will always be that way if the song has
dominants at the indicated places and all songs have dominants at one
or more of the indicated places.

This is something bedrock you can build on and get the sound
internalized.

Those changes are in thousands of tunes and define their chord
progressions.

There are plenty of songs that have one to all of these moves, so
examining this group of related chords and their toneset once the sound
is internalized may result in an epiphany of sorts.

If this all sounds exotic, it isn't.

this is the music all jazz musicians play, and it all has this
commonality - the tunes can be built by putting dominants over tertian
bass notes and modulation to other keys to do the same thing.

This is regardless of what 'theory' did or didn't generate the tunes.
They'll still fit this model.

If you learn 2-5 and can move it to anything and still think of
yourself as either staying in the key or modulating and reestablishing
another key, you're done with needing much more for analysis.

The reason to go thru this is to make chord progressions internal so
you hear it and don't have to think about reacting to it.

That requires a simple model, I think, so trying to insert extra steps
like modes can't help but slow down the process.

It's a redundant step, so at the advice of better players, I shucked it
and am more together for having done so.

Clif Kuplen

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#8: Re: All Of You - Analysis

Posted on 2005-12-24 19:04:53 by Joey Goldstein

Chuck Sher's changes for this tune are:

Fm7b5 (Bb7b9) |Eb6 |Fm7b5 |(Bb7b9) |

Fm7b5 (Bb7b9) |Eb6 |Abm6 |Db9(13) |

Gm7 |C7#5 |Fm7 Bb7 |

Ebmaj7 Db9(13) |C7b9 |Fm7 |Bb9 ||

Fm7b5 (Bb7b9) |Eb6 |Fm7b5 |(Bb7b9) |

Fm7b5 (Bb7b9) |Eb6 |Gm7 |C7b9 |

Abmaj7 |Am7b5 D7b9 |Gm7 (Db7(#11) |C7 |

Fm7 |Bb9 |Eb6 |(Bb9(sus4)) ||

Chords in parentheses are optional.

In major keys the standard SD D T sentence is either:
IV V7 I or IIm V7 I
In minor keys the standard SD D T sentence is:
IVm V7 Im or IIm7b5 V7 Im

This tune uses lots of SD area stuff from the key of Eb minor mixed into
an overall key feeling of Eb major. In Eb major both IIm7b5 and IVm,
because the occur so often, are often analysed as Subdominant Minor
harmony (SDM) rather than as an actual change of mode into Eb minor.
Note: Classical guys don't call a change from major to minor a &quot;key
chnage&quot;. It's called a &quot;change of mode&quot;. A key change requires a change
of tonic and Eb maj and Eb min share the same tonic.
(And they get pissed off at us for using the word &quot;mode&quot; the way we use
it. sheesh. &lt;g&gt;)

njsteve wrote:
&gt;
&gt; Hi,
&gt;
&gt; I'm working my way every so slowly through a nice chord melody
&gt; arrangement of the tune All Of You by Cole Porter.
&gt;
&gt; In my efforts to speed up the time it takes me to learn a new chord
&gt; melody arrangement I decided it might be a good idea to take a look at
&gt; the chords and try and figure out what is going on instead of just
&gt; trying to muscle my way through the tune.
&gt;
&gt; So right out of the gate I am a little stumped. Abm9, Bb13(b9),
&gt; Ebmaj7. I love the sound of this progression and it kind of reminds me
&gt; of the way a ii V I sounds but the minor iv chord has me perplexed.
&gt; The same note that makes the Ab minor is also the flat 9 for the V
&gt; chord. That note is Cb. Looking at this from a modal point of view I
&gt; just don't get it. This progressions seems to be built on an Eb Major
&gt; scale with a flat 6 and that is not something I am familiar with.
&gt;
&gt; So how would you categorize this progression? Is it iv, V7, I ? What
&gt; scales would you use to solo over this progressions? Ab melodic minor
&gt; sounds interesting when played over the Abm9.
&gt;
&gt; I'd appreciate any feedback on this seemingly simple progression.
&gt;
&gt; Thanks in advance,
&gt; Steve

--
Joey Goldstein
<a href="http://www.joeygoldstein.com" target="_blank">http://www.joeygoldstein.com</a>
joegold AT sympatico DOT ca

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#9: Re: All Of You - Analysis

Posted on 2005-12-24 20:46:26 by tombrown

This is Cole Porter's alltime favorite move--a cadence in minor that
resolves to major. He does it in song after song after song.

The ivmin V7 I is very closely related to the iimin7b5 V7 I, because
ivmin and iimin7b5 can be seen as two different inversions of the same
chord. It's a good idea to get used to treating ivmin and iimin7b5 as
functionally interchangeable. Try substituting one for the other in
various songs until you get the sound in your head.

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